Gamma rays Originating dwarf galaxy existence of Dark Matter Maybe Shows

Astronomy Science ~ A team of astronomers led by Dr. Alex Geringer-Sameth from Carnegie Mellon University, has detected gamma rays emanatin...

Astronomy Science ~ A team of astronomers led by Dr. Alex Geringer-Sameth from Carnegie Mellon University, has detected gamma rays emanating from the newly discovered dwarf galaxy reticulum 2. According to scientists, this may signal detection of dark matter lurking in galactic nuclei.

Reticulum 2 discovery announced yesterday by a group of astronomers at Cambridge University's Institute of Astronomy, UK. This dwarf galaxy located in the constellation Reticulum, located about 97,000 light-years away. It is the object of a very long, its length is about 200 light-years. Due to the large tidal forces of our Milky Way galaxy, Reticulum 2 are in the process of being torn apart.

New satellite image of the Milky Way galaxy Reticulum 2
"In the search for dark matter, gamma rays from dwarf galaxies has long been regarded as a sign of a very strong," said team member Dr Savvas Koushiappas from Brown University. "It looks like we now can detect things like that for the first time," he said. Astronomers have seen signs of gamma rays from dwarf galaxies over the last few years the NASA space telescope Fermi Gamma-ray. But the signal is never as clear as this.

By using the data from the telescope, Dr. Koushiappas, Dr. Geringer-Sameth and his colleagues have shown gamma rays coming from the direction of Reticulum 2 more than expected. Astronomers caution that this is an interesting preliminary results, there is much work to be done to confirm the origin of dark matter. A leading theory suggests the existence of dark matter particles called Weakly Interacting Massive Particles (WIMPs).

When a WIMP pair meet, they destroy each other, releasing high energy gamma rays. If that is true, then there should be plenty of gamma rays coming from places where WIMP considered abundant, such as the centers of galaxies.

The problem is the high-energy rays also come from other sources, including black holes and pulsars, which makes it difficult to distinguish dark matter signal from background interference. That is why the importance of dwarf galaxies in the hunt for dark matter particles. Dwarf galaxy is estimated to lack any other source of gamma rays, so that the flow of gamma rays from a dwarf galaxy would make a very strong candidate for the presence of dark matter.
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Astronomy Science: Gamma rays Originating dwarf galaxy existence of Dark Matter Maybe Shows
Gamma rays Originating dwarf galaxy existence of Dark Matter Maybe Shows
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